How to Keep Your Audience Reading

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Listen …

Just because you got people to read your headline doesn’t mean your job is done.

Nor is your job done if they read the first sentence. Or the second.

This article is a case in point.

I might have hooked you with the headline … intrigued you with the first sentence … lured you with the second, third, and so on, until you and I meet right here, at the ninth.

“Hmm,” I say, kicking a pebble with my shoe. “What to do next?”

I’ve got an idea.

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How to Write Copy Like Google

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Have you ever wondered who writes copy for Google … who puts together the words on the landing pages or in the video scripts for products like Gmail, Google+, Analytics, or Nexus?

Of course you don’t (unless you’re a copywriter). Because it doesn’t matter. You just want the product.

Now.

But why is that? Why does it seem that Google’s copy is so good, that their products are so hard to resist?

Well, it’s less about the writer — and all about the audience. Or, to be clear, what their writers know about the audience.

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7 Ways to Write Damn Bad Copy

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It’s obvious that creativity is an essential part of being a remarkable writer.

But when a results-oriented writer says “creative” and an image-oriented writer says “creative” you have to understand that they are talking about two completely different things.

The results-oriented writer emphasizes problem solving with clear, concise, and compelling copy (for example: How do I demonstrate that our product will solve our target customer’s problem?).

The image-oriented writer puts an emphasis on artistic, clever, or humorous copy (for example: How can I demonstrate how entertaining and crafty I am?).

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The Writer’s Author Rank Cheat Sheet

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Editor’s note: On August 28, 2014, Google ended their Authorship program. To discover what this means for you as an online content creator, check out this post by Sonia Simone.

Mention the words “Author Rank” and online writers typically cock their heads or raise an eyebrow.

They’ve more than likely heard of it, but defining it is an entirely different animal.

That’s because it refers to a nebulous Google algorithm that seems more legend than reality and can often cause confusion.

Yet, if you’ve been following us over the last five posts in this series you probably realize that the developments behind Author Rank (Google+, Search + Your World, and authorship markup) will help you drive more traffic to your website, increase your online visibility, and establish your online authority.

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10 Reasons Writers Should Claim Their Google Authorship Markup

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Editor’s note: On August 28, 2014, Google ended their Authorship program. To discover what this means for you as an online content creator, check out this post by Sonia Simone.

To say Stephen King is prolific is a gross understatement. Since he published his first novel (Carrie) back in 1973, he’s written over 70 more.

Early in King’s career, he wanted to write and publish constantly — which was against the prevailing wisdom of the time — and eventually convinced Signet to let him release a few books under the pen name “Richard Bachmann.”

King also wanted to answer the question of whether success was related to luck or talent. He went as far as purposefully suppressing the marketing of his Bachmann books.

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Why Google+ Is the Best Social Platform for Content Marketers

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Play along with me here for a minute.

Imagine some drunk wandering down the sidewalk at 3 in the morning. He’s got a cigarette dangling from his lip and a half-empty beer bottle he’s sloshing around in his hand. He’s alternately singing “Paradise by the Dashboard Light,” kicking the rearview mirrors of parked cars, and sobbing.

He’s a sad sight — until he slips on the ice in front of your house.

You run out and help him to his feet. He thanks you, pinches your cheek, and says, “I love you man.” You hand him his now empty bottle, shove him off, and think that’s the end of it.

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