Why Lazy People Make the Best Content Marketers

how to be a lazy content marketer

Traditional marketing and content marketing have something important in common.

In order to get the business results you want — more leads, sales, and profits — you have to do them consistently over time.

In traditional marketing, you don’t place one ad or send out one brochure and think your work is done.

And in content marketing, you can’t write five blog posts or record three podcast episodes and expect them to transform your profits.

If you want content to grow your business, you have to produce it regularly. I compared it to a hamster wheel here.

It’s a lot of work, and you have to keep it up. That’s why I recommend adopting the lazy person’s approach to content marketing.

Surprised? There’s a lot we can learn from lazy people.
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The 79-Year Master Plan for Becoming Unforgettable

masterful moves that get attention and keep it

During his career he was loved, hated, admired, dissed, fought over … but never ignored.

His name? Pablo Diego José Francisco de Paula Juan Nepomuceno María de los Remedios Cipriano de la Santísima Trinidad Ruiz y …

Picasso.

Anybody with a name like that was bound to lead a big, bold, messy life, and Picasso did exactly that.

I have to confess that I’ve had a creative crush on him ever since I first encountered his work in my college art history class.

But it wasn’t until I stood in front of piece after piece of his art that I learned the most important lesson Picasso ever taught me — and how it applies to content marketing.

I’ll get to that.

First, let’s talk about a few other digital marketing and sales lessons I’ve gleaned from the life of this amazing, torrential painter.
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How to Take the Guesswork Out of Content Marketing

stop guessing and start knowing

Authority, our advanced content marketing training program, is open to new members this week only.

Why should you care? Read on.

Here’s the harsh truth about any marketing: there’s no magic switch you can flip to turn it “on” and make it start working immediately.

Marketing with content is no exception to this rule.

Content marketing results happen slowly, and they happen over time.

If you do it right, you’ll create content that continues to send you new prospects and customers for many years after you created it.

If you do it right is the operative phrase here.
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A Champion of Creative Play

hero's journey - an advocate for creative expression

Life was simple when we were seven, wasn’t it?

A puddle and some pebbles, crayons and paper, a piece of chalk and a sidewalk — that’s all we needed to keep us happy and amused for hours.

But somewhere along the way, most of us lose this sense of joy in simple creative pleasures.

Today, you’ll learn about Melissa Dinwiddie’s quest to bring creativity back into your daily life.

Melissa’s story is this month’s Hero’s Journey feature. We’re tapping the collective wisdom of our community members to bring you reports from the front lines of the content marketing world. Read all of the Hero’s Journey posts here.

Here’s Melissa to share her journey in her own words.
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That Was Then, This Is Now: Welcome to the New Copyblogger Website

Image of fireworks - welcome to the new copyblogger

Welcome!

Things may look a little different since the last time you stopped by our place.

We’ve been working as a team to build a new home for our Copyblogger content since last year.

Today is open house day, so come on in and I’ll give you a tour.
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Should You Write for Fans or Customers?

tough choice: admirers or buyers

Mickey Spillane did not suffer from delusions of grandeur.

He didn’t expect his novels — featuring private eye Mike Hammer — to be regarded as great works of literature.

What he wanted was for them to sell.

I have no fans. You know what I got? Customers. And customers are your friends. – Mickey Spillane

His books have sold more than 225 million copies, so this approach served him well.

As we build an online presence with our content marketing, we have to answer this essential question:

Should we develop fans or customers?

The answer isn’t as straightforward as it may seem.
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